A search engine for election podcasts

As the U.S. presidential election ratchets up, political podcasts have seen a handsome spike in the iTunes charts. The Hillary Clinton campaign recently debuted its own show, With her, co-hosted by Clinton herself and Max Linsky of the Longform podcast.

It’s exciting to see the podcast medium take on a more expansive role in mainstream political discourse, where candidates’ words are replayed, parsed, and meticulously scrutinized, especially in the home stretch of the election.

But much of what is said in podcast interviews and discussions is completely invisible to web searches, making it difficult to find and share.

At Audiosear.ch, Pop Up Archive’s sister project, we’re helping to overcome that obstacle by generating full-text transcripts and descriptive tags that help identify and reference key moments of interest in podcasts. Here’s a sampling of quotes from Audiosear.ch transcripts that highlight recent developments as heard in 2016 presidential election podcasts.

With her: “Hi, Hillary”
Since the DNC convention, Hillary’s campaign (and podcast, by extension) has worked to portray her in a more personal light, with the hope that the beer-drinking, exercise-averse Hillary may resonate more with the average voter.

“I try to get exercise. Now I’m not going to pretend that I like it, because I don’t.” —Hillary Clinton

With her peaked at #1 on the iTunes charts on August 14, 2016. See more charts

The Savage Nation: 8-18
On the heels of his Milwaukee address to African American voters, Donald Trump discussed his “outreach efforts” on the right-wing Savage Nation.

Savage: “How would you help poor black people in this nation?”
Trump: “We need spirit. We don’t have spirit. We don’t have any spirit whatsoever. We need law and order. We have to have it. And that was my speech last night.”

The Run-Up: “Why She’s Distrusted”
Some commentators claim that Clinton’s growing margins in the polls are more of a referendum on Trump than a vote for Hillary.The Run-Up discusses persisting credibility issues that surround the Clinton campaign.

“Why wasn’t [Hillary] willing to have a government email account like every other employee of the State Department? That goes to the broader issue around the Clintons: that they simply don’t view themselves as being subject to the same regulations that the rest of the world has to comply with.” —Mark Landler, White House correspondent for the New York Times ​

The Run-Up peaked at #2 on the iTunes charts on August 16, 2016. See more charts

No One Knows Anything: “Trump’s Foreign Policy Is Foreign To The Republican Party”
Some top-ranking Republicans who have broken with party line to support Hillary say they find Clinton more reliable, especially on issues of national security.

“I wouldn’t trust Donald Trump to run the kitchen in a Wendy’s, much less our nuclear arsenal which is the largest and most capable nuclear force in the world.” —Republican National Security adviser John Noonan

FiveThirtyEight Elections: “Clinton Republicans”
Some say Republican support for Hillary isn’t that far of a stretch across the aisle, given her moderate-to-conservative foreign policy stance.

“The easiest Republicans who are able to reconcile with Clinton are the foreign policy establishment because she is pretty centrist…even a little bit hawkish, whereas on economic policy fairly liberal and social policy very liberal, which is kind of the way the institutional Democratic Party is going.” —political statistician Nate Silver

Rachel Maddow Show: 8/16
Restructuring in light of slipping poll numbers, Trump has hired Roger Ailes, the recently deposed head of Fox News, and Steve Bannon, CEO of Breitbart News — controversial picks that have added to the media circus surrounding his campaign.

“It’s a little odd that [Roger Ailes] the man at the center of the highest profile sexual harassment scandal since Bill Cosby would be brought on board by a presidential campaign while that sexual harassment scandal was still erupting… Of course, what’s expected about it is that if there’s anybody that doesn’t care about that kind of scandal, it’s Donald Trump.”

Glenn Beck: “Brad Thor: No Longer#Never Trump”

Glenn Beck, known for his incendiary right-wing politicking, calls Steve Bannon’s journalistic integrity into question now that he’s taken up with Trump.

“Steve Bannon, who is one of the worst people, now he’s become the CEO of the Trump campaign… Andrew Breitbart would be spinning in his grave.”

Search podcasts at Audiosear.ch

Archiving the pioneering voices of punk

Ramones_Toronto_1976

Punk broke in the summer of 1976 and spread like a heatwave as the Ramones made their eponymous debut and invaded England with their tough, no-frills rock. Long incubating in the post-hippie era, punk was named for the sonic deviance of bands like the Sex Pistols — who debuted Anarchy in the U.K. that same year — the Buzzcocks, Patti Smith, Television, the Clash, and countless others armed with noise-bearing instruments.

More an attitude than a sound, punk began as a youthful distillation of anti-establishment politics, street grit, and even a dose of French surrealism (Richard Hell famously claims to have stolen his enfant terrible act from Arthur Rimbaud). It spawned various sub-genres, many still heard today, and contributed DIY (do it yourself) to the cultural lexicon, championing hyper-localism when it was still as alien as mohawks and fashionably ripped clothes. Today we celebrate 40 years of punk with audio artifacts of the shock heard around the world.

1. Interview with Penelope Spheeris (Bullseye)

Jesse Thorn interviews director Penelope Spheeris about Decline of Western Civilization, her 1979 documentary on the LA punk scene featuring candid interviews with teen punkers and live performances by the Germs, X, Black Flag, and others. The documentary captures the youthful exuberance of the scene as well as the nihilism and addiction problems that befell many.

2. Just Girls: The Hidden World of Patti Smith and Judy Linn (Kitchen Sisters)

The Kitchen Sisters share audio snapshots of punk icon Patti Smith, intimate and quotidian, as recorded by her friend Judy Linn in the ’70s. The vignettes capture the interior life and voice of the quirky and dreamy youth Patti writes about in her seminal biography Just Kids.

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“To me, punk rock is the freedom to create, freedom to be successful, freedom to not be successful, freedom to be who you are. It’s freedom.” —Patti Smith

3. Maximum Rocknroll: Punk magazine, radio show, record label, and vinyl archive since 1977 (KALW)

KALW gives a tour of the Maximum Rocknroll house, ground zero of West Coast punk, headquarters of the fanzine, and home to the world’s largest archive of punk records. As punk arose in reaction to the excesses of ’70s rock and hippie idealism, fanzines were used to get the word out about underground shows and albums. In 1982, Jello Biafra of the Dead Kennedys and Maximum Rocknroll founder Tim Yohannan released a compilation of Northern California and Nevada punk rock; the album’s liner notes would be published as the first issue of MRR, which has stayed true to its austere form — black-and-white newsprint — well into the digital age.

4. The Stranger (Snap Judgement)

Musician Damien Jurado tells about his adolescent retreat into the cabalistic world of punk zines and records, and the shabby janitor who got him hooked (no spoilers, but Damien’s punk pusher would go on to revolutionize the genre).

5. Rocket To Russia (Sound Opinions)

Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot talk to drummer Tommy Ramone, who lays down the origin story of punk and details from recording the Ramones’ first three records, including Rocket to Russia. Jim and Greg dissect the 1977 classic record and its punchy, two-minute anthems including “Sheena is a Punk Rocker” — the epitome of the genre, according to the rock doctors.

6. Carrie Brownstein on Punk Rock and ‘Portlandia’ (Forum)

Sleater Kinney guitarist Carrie Brownstein discusses her coming up through the Olympia punk and riot grrrl scenes, feminism, and her new memoir Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl.

How to use Pop Up Archive’s plugin for Adobe Audition

 Working with raw tape often means toggling from window to window in order to align transcripts with audio editing software. With Pop Up Archive’s extension for Adobe Audition, you can simplify this process by bringing audio and transcript editing into one workspace.

We’ll walk you through the steps of setting up and using the extension in Adobe Audition.

 Download the Pop Up Archive add-on and open it in your editor

Once you’ve downloaded the Pop Up Archive add-on from the add-on store, you can open up the Pop Up Archive panel from the “Windows” drop-down menu under “Extensions.

You can snap the Pop Up Archive window into place by clicking the upper left corner and dragging the “Editor” panel in the dock.

Sync a Pop Up Archive audio item with a file in Audition

Open an audio file in Audition and transcribe by dragging and dropping it into the Pop Up Archive panel.

Once the file has finished transcribing, you can sync the transcript with your audio but selecting the Audition file and then pressing play in Pop Up Archive. Jump to any moment of interest by clicking the Pop Up Archive waveform or transcript — the waveforms sync up!

Note: Audition will sync with whatever file is open in Pop Up Archive, so make sure you have the same file open in both windows.

Search your transcript and mark key moments

Waveform syncing enables you to search for moments of interest in your Pop Up Archive transcript and mark that same moment in Premiere.

Find key moments of interest using the search toolbar. Type in a keyword and press the play button to the left of the line of text. Now toggle over to your Audition editing panel. Create markers by pressing hotkey M to indicate the beginning and end points of your clip. Copy to new and then rename this segment.

Upload more audio

Got more audio? Drag and drop audio into the extension window. Remember to select the new file in the Audition panel and press play in Pop Up Archive to sync the files. 

Transcribing the “ingenuously boring” world of Sleep With Me

Drew Ackerman is anything but boring, but he has a certain knack for putting people to sleep.

His popular “Sleep With Me” podcast, a series of absurdist ramblings that swirl around your brain before dropping you off in dreamland, originated out of his own lifelong struggles with insomnia.

“When I was a kid, I couldn’t sleep because I would get terrible anxiety about school. One day I discovered Dr. Demento’s radio show and it would make me laugh and put me at ease enough to be able to fall asleep.”

Drew, who narrates the show as the persona Dearest Scooter, bears more than a few resemblances to his zany radio idol, but adds a dose of mumblecore and bedtime storytelling to Dr. Demento’s schtick.

My show is for people who aren’t interested in guided meditation and who don’t want to feel guilty about falling asleep to Roman Mars,” he jokes. “People can fall asleep to me guilt-free, because they won’t miss out on anything important.”

Like improv comedy, Drew riffs off of prompts — song titles generated by iPod Shuffle, Twitter trends, Reddit topics, Venmo payments — to spin plot lines on the fly and see where they land. The trick, he says, is not being too funny or entertaining, because he doesn’t want to keep people up past their bedtime. At 420 episodes, “Sleep With Me” is a vast ecosystem of free-association sleep-inducing prolix that the New Yorker calls “ingeniously boring.”


Drew uses Pop Up Archive to transcribe episodes and create a written record of his improvised storytelling, mapping out the bizarro world he’s created. He aims to revisit certain stories and develop jokes and plot lines, just in case some listeners are actually paying attention. Plus, some people prefer to read before going to bed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Before using Pop Up Archive, the only written record of “Sleep With Me” were these show notes written by Drew in an illegible fit of profound inspiration.


 Drew is also thinking about translating the transcripts to create foreign language spinoffs of the show, because why not?

“I got into podcasts because I love how they provide a window into other people’s worlds,” Drew says. Through “Sleep With Me,” he’s created his own fantastically mundane world — one shared with a legion of well-rested listeners.

Hear and read Sleep With Me

Turning to the past to understand race in America today

“If we talk about the past decade, if we talk about the past century, if we talk about the past two centuries… what we ought to seek in discussing black history are lessons on how to struggle today,” said Dr. Angela Davis during a lecture at Occidental College.

The frequency and impunity with which police use deadly force against people of color shatter any notion that racial inequity ended in the ’60s.

#BlackLivesMatter has sparked a national dialogue similar to that of the Civil Rights era, when Angela Davis, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Stokely Carmichael, and countless others combined grassroots activism with the media pulpit to speak out against racial injustice. Their words, despite the intervening decades, describe our own times to eerie effect.

Archival recordings from Pop Up Archive’s public collections speak volumes on race and racism in America and the legacy of black activism:

 The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee talks and sings with Studs Terkel (1961)—WFMT

Students describe how the violence they incur during sit-ins and freedom rides strengthens their resolve in the fight against segregation and voter suppression.

Sometimes when the person next to us was being pulled off the line and being beaten and knocked to the ground, we’d still sing and hold our heads high and walk in unity and strength.” —SNCC member Bernard Lafayette, 1961

 Martin Luther King speaks (1968)—Ethnic Studies Library

This audio recording is a dense archaeological treasure. In addition to Martin Luther King, Jr.’s rousing speech to a union calling for racial equity in the labor movement and a jail cell news interview with Black Panther leader Huey Newton, this recording contains a KPFA reporter’s interview with Mr. and Mrs. Smith about the “common experience of many families in the black ghetto.” The Oakland couple describes police hostility aimed at their family and community and how officers’ racially motivated violence is inspiring the rise of armed self-defense groups, like the Black Panthers, in their neighborhood.

After they let me up, they were still beating my son and blood was running every which way and I asked the police department, ‘Please don’t kill him.’
—Oakland resident Luther Smith, 1968


Alabama State troopers attack demonstrators outside Selma, Alabama,
on Bloody Sunday, March 7, 1965.

 Dick Gregory talks with Studs Terkel (1961)—WMFT

Comedian and social critic Dick Gregory describes the historical connections between American foreign conflict and racial turmoil, describing how wars exacerbate the “us” vs “them” mentality. After fighting to “liberate” Vietnam, black soldiers returned home to find their own freedoms restricted by increasingly militarized racial boundaries, he explains.

The speeches that black folks are making today are straight out of the pages of Thomas Jefferson and Thomas Paine.” —Dick Gregory, 1964

 H. Rap Brown and Stokely Carmichael address the Black Panthers (1968)—Pacifica Archives

Hearing this clip of H. Rap Brown speak at a “Free Huey” Black Panthers rally in Cleveland, there is no question where he got his name. The crowd roars as Rap waxes political with equal parts fire and wit. He and Stokely speak to the rise of black militarism, saying Vietnam has taught black soldiers how to go to war. It’s time, they rally, to fight for their own freedom.

We are the vanguard of the revolution because we are the most dispossessed.”—Black Panther H. Rap Brown, 1968

 Angela Davis at Occidental College (1985)—Pacifica Archives

Speaking at a Black History Month event at Occidental College, Angela Davis describes the prison system as a tool of enslavement, recounting her own imprisonment (on charges of kidnapping and murder, for which she was later acquitted) as an attempt to suppress her political outspokenness.

Each time black people have won victories, this has meant the extension of rights and liberties for the vast majority of the population in America.”
—activist/scholar Angela Davis, 1985

Explore more archival audio

Transcribing sacred speech with Pop Up Archive

With rousing sermon titles like “Spin City Jesus,” “Healing by Eating Cold Grease,” and “Hell Is for Accountants,” Duke University’s Chapel Recordings Collection proves that church sanctity need not come at the expense of grade-A entertainment.

The purpose of the collection is to aid would-be preachers in the field of homiletics — a new word to us, too, that means the art of writing and delivering sermons — explains Molly Bragg, Duke’s Digital Collections Program Manager.

In 2014, Molly and University Archivist Valerie Gillespie set about digitizing the Duke Chapel recordings in response to divinity students’ requests to access the collection’s sermons, which date from 1946 to 2002. Since then, their team has digitized and made available 1,400 audio/video items and 1,300 printed manuscripts.


The Duke Chapel Recordings web archive allows students to analyze sermons for theological and rhetorical components. It also serves as a historical resource, documenting Duke campus life and world events surrounding the sermons.


Students protest apartheid outside of the Duke Chapel, May 4, 1985.

“An archive of sermons offers [students] a relational time-machine, a gateway to the past where a preacher’s words reach out in a handshake, introducing their time, and place,” says Adrienne Koch, Project Director at Duke Divinity School.

South African activist Desmond Tutu’s 1986 sermon at Duke is a standout example of global and local history converging at the pulpit. Tutu addressed the congregation during worldwide protests against apartheid (including one on Duke’s campus) and thanked students for their prayers and support.


Duke is using Pop Up Archive to transcribe sermons like Tutu’s with the goal of tagging and making them searchable by speaker, themes, and Biblical references. The university is also using the transcripts to create closed captioning files for hearing-disabled people. After revising transcripts with Pop Up Archive’s editor, student workers export the time-stamped transcripts as WebVTT files, which display as captions on Duke’s web video player.

“Duke Chapel is welcoming to all, and the goal of this project is to provide access for as many people who would not otherwise experience the collection’s historical documents and audiovisual content,” says Molly. “Having multiple formats enables us to do that.”

Hear and Read Duke Chapel Recordings

Pop Up Archive’s Time Saver For 2016 Radio Racers

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On the weekend of August 6-7, our pals at KCRW’s Independent Producer Project are hosting their fourth annual Radio Race—a chance for pro and hobbyist sound collectors to test their chops against the clock and produce a nonfiction radio story within 24 hours. 

To help radio racers get their stories in the can, Pop Up Archive is offering free audio transcriptions for participants. Pop Up Archives’ transcriptions save participants valuable production time so they can quickly zero on their best content and, with the help of our new Adobe Audition plug-in, easily edit and stitch clips together.

Winners will have their radio piece featured on KCRW’s “UnFictional” and will receive a free year’s subscription to Pop Up Archive’s 1-hour/month plan.

Already signed up for the race? Head over to Pop Up Archive to sign up for our free demo.

Ready, set, record! Read on for our Pop Up Archive guide for Radio Race participants:

Continue reading

A tool for teaching students to make oral histories heard

OHLA’s SHARE Civil Rights Oral History Project documents the history of African Americans in Southwest Michigan.

Oral History in the Liberal Arts (OHLA) is taking undergrads out of the classroom to learn from people in the community and document their stories in engaging and shareable media projects.

The project, recently launched by the Great Lakes College Association, is developing interdisciplinary curricula and toolkits to facilitate community-based student research and digital storytelling — and relies on Pop Up Archive to simplify its workflow and facilitate collaboration.

So far, OHLA students have documented inequities in housing policy in Dayton, OH, youth radio in Meadville, PA, and African American communities in southwest Michigan. OHLA has ambitious plans to bring together diverse communities and disciplines as well as the faculty and staff at the Great Lakes College Association’s 13 member colleges.


“For me, everything begins with Pop Up Archive,” says Brooke Bryan, OHLA Co-Director.

“We’ve found that using Pop Up as a collaborative interface allows faculty fast access to narratives that come in as their students conduct interviews, and the private server fosters collaboration and team-based close listening as we edit and refine the automatic transcripts in Pop Up’s wonderful line-by-line interface.”


Like most oral history projects, OHLA collects lots of content-rich, long-form interviews, which can be cumbersome to work with and difficult to navigate. “Not very many people listen to oral histories unless they are digested into documentaries or podcasts,” says Brooke.

Using Pop Up Archive’s transcription, time-stamping, and indexing features, OHLA is able to map out and parse their audio files. Pairing Pop Up Archive with a podcast hosting app called Podigee, OHLA segments its long-form interviews into tagged audio chapters and directs listeners to particular topics of interest.

“This is a great workflow for lean and mean projects that want to publish a series of interviews quickly, while facilitating access to particular moments in each interview across the collection,” Bryan says.

OHLA is also pairing Pop Up Archive with an app called Oral History Metadata Synchronizer, OHMS, to publish audio transcripts to WordPress and create a searchable online research collection that houses all of its oral history projects. This repository will serve as a pedagogical model for interactive learning between students and communities.

The OHLA team has already started building a web hub to showcase faculty and student work. Check out their progress at the new OHLA website.

Four picks to get you fired up for the Fourth!

We’ve cued up an Independence Day playlist for you to savor while you prep for your backyard BBQ.

 America Eats: A Hidden Archive—The Kitchen Sisters
It’s hard to imagine July Fourth without barbecue, burgers, brats, potato salad, slaw, and watermelon. The Kitchen Sisters explore how food gives flavor to our most time-honored traditions and how it is tied to our very notions of place and personhood. In this episode, the Kitchen Sisters continue the legacy of America Eats—a WPA program started in the 1930s to document American foodways—and explore how blue-plate specials and down-home cooking reflect our national fabric.

Mapping America, one dish at a time. share on Twitter

 The Marketplace of Revolution: How Consumer Politics Shaped American Independence—Focus 580 (Illinois Public Media)
Red, white, and blue are synonymous with July Fourth, but the color of money was an early motif in the American Revolution. The desire for imported goods, notably teapots, created the tempest that would eventually rally patriots’ cries for independence.

How free-market capitalism motivated colonists’ cries for freedom. share on Twitter

 July 04,1970—From the Vault (Pacifica)
The cultural revolutions of the 1960s changed the discourse surrounding freedom and independence. Archival audio from a July 4, 1970 celebration in Washington, D.C. captures differing views on patriotism and the American legacy following the Civil Rights movement, anti-war efforts, the Stonewall Riots, second-wave feminism, and the rise of Black Power.

What the American Revolution meant in the wake of sixties’ revolutionary movements. share on Twitter

 Tips for a Successful Summer Barbecue—Forum (KQED)
Chefs and food writers share their favorite recipes and pro-tips for delicious July Fourth fare, for meaty grillmasters and vegetarian celebrants alike. This episode is chock full of fresh ideas (smoked fish, Mexican elote and bitter-green salad, to name a few) for those looking to mix up their holiday menu.

Recipes and tips on how to lock down your July 4th spread. share on Twitter

Open Audio Weekend

Creating better access, engagement, & sharing tools for audio

Last weekend Pop Up Archive teamed up with New York Public Library Labs and The Moth for Open Audio Weekend, a two day hackathon to prototype new tools for digital audio. The event was the culmination of work on the Together We Listen, a project supported by the Knight Foundation Prototype grant which was awarded to NYPL and The Moth in late 2015 to explore using crowd-sourcing corrections to Pop Up Archive’s automatic transcripts. Continue reading