KALW on Pop Up Archive

This week we are thrilled to welcome KALW San Francisco Public Radio into Pop Up Archive! That means thousands of pieces of in-depth Bay Area reporting made instantly listenable and searchable.

KALW: “We were excited to work with Pop Up Archive, not just because of their familiarity with the archival needs of a public radio station, but also their enthusiasm for solving database issues. The archive they have built for us will streamline our newsroom operations moving forward by enabling us to organize, track, and reuse our valuable content.”

You can start listening to the KALW Collection right now.

Want your audio archive to look like this? Shoot us an email and tell us about your audio needs.

KALW on Pop Up Archive

 

KALW on Pop Up Archive

This week we are thrilled to welcome KALW San Francisco Public Radio into Pop Up Archive! That means thousands of pieces of in-depth Bay Area reporting made instantly listenable and searchable.

KALW: “We were excited to work with Pop Up Archive, not just because of their familiarity with the archival needs of a public radio station, but also their enthusiasm for solving database issues. The archive they have built for us will streamline our newsroom operations moving forward by enabling us to organize, track, and reuse our valuable content.”

You can start listening to the KALW Collection right now.

Want your audio archive to look like this? Shoot us an email and tell us about your audio needs.

From the Archive: Nora Ephron on Objective Journalism

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Listen to this fascinating Studs Terkel interview with Nora Ephron from 1975.

Here is Ephron on the role of personal politics in journalism, and the difficulty of objectively reporting on the women’s movement:

I’ve never believed in objective journalism, and no one who is a journalist in his or her right mind does, because all writing is about selecting what you want to use. And as soon as you choose what to select, you’re not being objective…For someone like me, who was sympathetic to the women’s movement, and was trying to cover it as a journalist, I felt constantly in conflict between what my obligations were as a journalist [to reporting] the truth as I saw it[, and my belief in] the women’s movement. Because it always seemed if I wrote the truth about the movement that would somehow hurt it.

…If you write that the women spent the Democratic Convention squabbling among themselves, aren’t you giving people who want to put it down the ability to say, ‘oh those women, you give them a little power and they just behave like…cats and dog toward each other’? 

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https://www.popuparchive.com/tplayer/17367

We recently added even more Studs Terkel interviews to the archive. Listen to more esteemed interviewees like Ephron in our Studs Terkel collection.

New Tricks on Pop Up Archive: Easy Transcript Editing, Images, and Better Auto-Tags

Based on user feedback, we’ve added some new features to make managing your audio easier than ever.

On Pop Up Archive, you can now easily edit your transcripts on the fly with transcription key commands, add images to your collections, and get better auto-tags for your audio files:

image EASY TRANSCRIPT EDITING: Edit auto-transcripts with a single click:
Start by clicking the pencil button to the right of any line…

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…then use keyboard commands to play, pause, and jump between lines:

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image ADD IMAGES TO YOUR AUDIO: Select an image from your computer or paste a link to an image when you add or edit an audio item.
 
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image BETTER AUTO-TAGS: When we tag your audio automatically, we check the tags against Wikipedia to make sure they’re tag-worthy:

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As always, we’d love to hear your questions, suggestions, and ideas.
Coming soon: Heavy-duty improvements to the accuracy of auto-transcripts. We’ve got tricks up our sleeve, so stay tuned.

From the Archive: Buster Keaton and the Lost Art of Silent Film

Here’s one of our favorites from the Studs Terkel Collection:

Hear Studs Terkel in conversation with silent film star and master of the “mechanical gag,” Buster Keaton, in 1960. Be warned, you’ll never be able to go back from the shock of hearing that the world famous silent actor actually has a quite distinctive Marlboro Man voice.

Terkel quotes film critic James Agee in this powerful description of Keaton:

Keaton’s face ranked almost with Lincoln’s as an early American archetype; it was haunting, handsome, almost beautiful, yet it was irreducibly funny; he improved matters by topping it off with a deadly horizontal hat, as flat and thin as a phonograph record. 

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They go on to discuss the art of silent film, and how the values differed from modern sound cinema. In Keaton’s world, your subtitle count was the measure of your art. In the mute medium of silent film, the more you could communicate with sheer physicality, the more range you had as an actor.

Here Keaton and Terkel break down the concision of the silent film masters by the numbers, including a bet between Keaton and Charlie Chaplin:

Terkel: You had to communicate to the audience in only one way. Through action, through pantomime.

Keaton: That’s right. We eliminated subtitles just as fast as we could if we could possibly tell it in action.

Terkel: I remember you once told me something about ten years ago that you and Charlie Chaplin had a friendly contest, who could do the feature film with the least amount of subtitles.

Keaton: I think Chaplin won that. […] He got that one of his pictures down to something like 21 titles and I had 23.

Terkel: This is for an hour and a half film […]

Keaton: Another thing for you to call attention to is the average picture used 240 titles. That was about the average. […] And the most I have ever used was 56.

Listen to it on the Archive here.

For Record Store Day: The Contradictory History of Gennett Records

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Pictured: The Wolverines Jazz Band at Gennett Records. Jazz legend Bix Beiderbecke, second from right.

Today, for the seventh annual National Record Store Day, take a fascinating peek into the history of Gennett Studios in Richmond, Indiana with a story from Radiotopia podcasters, Everything Sounds.

Learn about the dark contradictions of the 1920s record business. The Indiana studio that released some of the most raw and wild 1920s blues from musicians like Blind Lemon Jefferson to Louis Armstrong, also pressed KKK records like “Onward Christian Klansman” by the thousands:

It seems bizarre, but a studio that regularly hosted African American musicians in the 20s had no issues with recording one of America’s most notorious hate groups.

https://www.popuparchive.org/embed_player/26%3A%20Gennett%20Records/10958/8042/1596

Listen to more of the Everything Sounds collection, and other Radiotopia shows like Radio Diaries and 99% Invisible on Pop Up Archive. 

From the Archive: Poet Carl Sandburg on Abraham Lincoln

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Photo colorization by Sanna Dullaway / Original image from the Library of Congress

Essential listen today on the anniversary of Lincoln’s assassination: a speech by poet Carl Sandburg at the Freedom Centennial Conference in Bement, Illinois in 1955 (from Illinois Public Media.)

In the speech, he recites a poem from a “homely congressman from the Jayhawker state,” who, Sandburg says, “spoke that afternoon one the best poems ever spoken about Lincoln. The poets have done no better by Lincoln than this humble Kansas congressman, Homer Koch:”

There is no new thing to be said about Lincoln. There is no new thing to be said of the mountains or of the sea or of the stars. The years go their way, but the same old granite mountains lift their shoulders above the drifting clouds. The same mysterious sea beats upon the shore. The same silent stars keep holy vigil above a tired world. But to the mountains and sea and stars, men turn forever in unwearied homage. And thus with Lincoln. For he was a mountain in grandeur of soul; he was a sea in deep undervoice of mystic loneliness; he was a star in steadfast purity of purpose and service, and he abides.

The lecture is posted in four parts on Pop Up Archive. Listen to the first part below:

https://www.popuparchive.org/embed_player/%22Freedom%2C%22%20the%20Bement%2C%20IL%2C%20Centennial%20Conference%20of%201955%26%2346%3B%20Speech%20by%20Carl%20Sandburg%2C%20part%201%20of%204%26%2346%3B/7759/5322/583

Get the rest of your Lincoln fix by checking out the Abraham Lincoln tag on Pop Up Archive.

Have a Happy Russian Cosmonaut Day with Pop Up’s NASA Audio

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On April 12th 1961, Yuri Gagarin became the first man in space while flying aboard the Vostok spacecraft. The Russian cosmonaut’s feat is honored internationally to this day. 

You can spot Gagarin’s name in the auto-transcripts in the NASA audio collection on Pop Up Archive. The collection features everything from flight simulations to space education programs for Boy Scouts. 

One highlight: listen to this amazing conversation call from President Obama to Commander Scott Altman on the Atlantis space shuttle servicing the Hubble Telescope: 

Check out the whole NASA audio collection right here!

From the Archive: Studs Terkel Interview with Maya Angelou

Check out this gem from the archive: an incredible 1970 Studs Terkel interview with Maya Angelou.

 

Listen to Angelou’s smooth, poetic voice as she tells the stories behind her autobiography, “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.” She speaking intimately about her grandmother and her youth in Stamps, Arkansas, even singing Studs some church hymns.

Browse the whole Studs Terkel collection on Pop Up Archive, featuring rare interviews with figures from Janis Joplin to David Mamet.