American Women Making History and Culture (1963-1982)

One of our all time favorite collections comes from the Pacifica Radio Archives: American Women Making History and Culture 1963-1982. As described by Pacifica:

[The recordings follow] the emergence and evolution of the Women’s movement in cities across the United States… as well as the unique role Pacifica Radio played by providing a place for women to create and air programming that communicated the movement.

The complete collection — nearly 1,700 reel-to-reel tapes — is becoming incrementally available as it’s digitized, with funding from NHPRC and completion slated for September 2015.  

Among the incredible voices are Sylvia Plath, Simone de Beauvoir, Yoko Ono, and Anais Nin. Interviews and readings from these eminent women and more are available to stream from Pop Up Archive directly, as well as at the Internet Archive. Take a listen to the digitized audio already available on in Pop Up’s Pacifica Archives collection.

American Women Making History and Culture (1963-1982)

One of our all time favorite collections comes from the Pacifica Radio Archives: American Women Making History and Culture 1963-1982. As described by Pacifica:

[The recordings follow] the emergence and evolution of the Women’s movement in cities across the United States… as well as the unique role Pacifica Radio played by providing a place for women to create and air programming that communicated the movement.

The complete collection — nearly 1,700 reel-to-reel tapes — is becoming incrementally available as it’s digitized, with funding from NHPRC and completion slated for September 2015.  

Among the incredible voices are Sylvia Plath, Simone de Beauvoir, Yoko Ono, and Anais Nin. Interviews and readings from these eminent women and more are available to stream from Pop Up Archive directly, as well as at the Internet Archive. Take a listen to the digitized audio already available on in Pop Up’s Pacifica Archives collection.

Creating accountability and access for news audio

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Politicians, by trade, speak often and at length. But the news cycle moves fast, and many words are quickly forgotten, or impossible to recover from hours of broadly labeled footage. That’s where we come in: rather than sift through hours of CSPAN video to research what’s been said about a policy, a search in Pop Up Archive takes you to the exact timestamped point of the relevant discussion.  

We’re processing audio for a number of news syndicates. Here are some news collections where you can search political keywords from the public archive:

  • The California Report (KQED): a daily news show for Northern California public media that follows the big issues and policy debates happening all around California.
  • Which Way, L.A.? (KCRW): Southern California’s "signature local public affairs program" covers not just local news, but also the most pressing national and international affairs.
  • News from Illinois Public Media: featuring top reporting out of NPR, Illinois Public Media, the Associated Press, and more.
  • Crosscurrents (KALW): In-depth local news served up daily through San Francisco Public Radio. 

While we’ve got you covered for radio news, what if you’re looking to search TV news? Thanks to a project from our friends at the Internet Archive, television news footage is more accessible than ever through the TV News Archive. They take media which has already been captioned and make that text searchable to the second.

The age of passive political listening is past. With these tools, you can zone in on your favorite issue with unprecedented acuity. 

Some of the faces of modern podcasting.

Top left: Roman Mars (99% Invisible), top right: State of the Re:Union team (SOTRU), middle left: Glynn Washington (Snap Judgment), middle right: The Kitchen Sisters (Hidden Kitchens, Fugitive Waves), bottom left: Ashley Milne-Tyte (The Broad Experience), bottom right: Jesse Thorn (Bullseye)

As much as we love archival audio, it’s not just sound from forgotten reels and cassettes that get uploaded to the site. New, “born digital” radio programs and podcasts get indexed in Pop Up Archive every day. Thanks to our partnership with PRX, you can search the entirety of all seven shows from the Radiotopia collective, such as 99% Invisible, Radio Diaries, and Theory of Everything — and that’s just the tip of the iceberg. We’re making modern radio stories just as easy to search as the audio we process from archives and historical societies.

If you haven’t already, dive into our Explore page to get a taste for yourself, where you can sort audio by Interviewee, Interviewer, and Collection, and more. 

Explore our public archive.

Some of the faces of modern podcasting.

Top left: Roman Mars (99% Invisible), top right: State of the Re:Union team (SOTRU), middle left: Glynn Washington (Snap Judgment), middle right: The Kitchen Sisters (Hidden Kitchens, Fugitive Waves), bottom left: Ashley Milne-Tyte (The Broad Experience), bottom right: Jesse Thorn (Bullseye)

As much as we love archival audio, it’s not just sound from forgotten reels and cassettes that get uploaded to the site. New, “born digital” radio programs and podcasts get indexed in Pop Up Archive every day. Thanks to our partnership with PRX, you can search the entirety of all seven shows from the Radiotopia collective, such as 99% Invisible, Radio Diaries, and Theory of Everything — and that’s just the tip of the iceberg. We’re making modern radio stories just as easy to search as the audio we process from archives and historical societies.

If you haven’t already, dive into our Explore page to get a taste for yourself, where you can sort audio by Interviewee, Interviewer, and Collection, and more. 

Explore our public archive.

A Pop Up Archive Guide for KCRW’s #Radio Race contestants!

This post is a special guide for contestants of KCRW’s Radio Race. For more support, consult our full FAQ, or shoot us a question at edison@popuparchive.com 

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What is this “Radio Race,” and what does Pop Up Archive have to do with it?

KCRW’s 24-Hour Radio Race is a whirlwind day of high-stakes radio making for producers of any experience level. Radio makers from all over the world will have 24 HOURS to write, record, and edit a nonfiction radio story. At 10AM (PT) on Saturday, all entrants will receive the THEME for this years Race. They will then have 24 hours to create a story that somehow relates to this theme. By Sunday at 10AM PT, their finished piece must be posted on Soundcloud for judging.

With only 24 hours to complete a finished piece, the last thing anyone wants to do is transcribe from scratch. That’s why we’re providing entrants with our auto-transcription toolkit. Use Pop Up Archive to help craft your Radio Race stories, and receive free transcriptions for up to an hour of audio! Sign up for our free demo plan here.

READ ON FOR OUR GUIDE TO THE POP UP ESSENTIALS:

1) UPLOAD

The first thing to do is to upload your audio to a collection on the “My Collections” page. We create one to get you started, but feel free to make as many as you want! Or if you’re using Adobe Audition, you can upload your audio file through the Audition interface using the Pop Up Archive add-on.

Pro tip: All collections are private by default, but you can also choose to make them public, and (optional) back up to Internet Archive. Learn more about privacy options.

*Remember to do this one at a time, unless you want multiple audio files to play on the same Pop Up Archive item page!* Watch this tutorial for more help uploading. 

 

2) PROCESSING (aka, take a much needed nap while our tech. does the grunt work.)

After upload, wait while we process it for automatic transcripts and tags. You can check on the processing status from the “my collections” page.

Pro tip: Keep in mind that we process audio close to real time (with some extra time depending on server speed.) That means an hour long file will take around an hour to process for a complete auto-transcript. Wav files, however, will take longer; so, convert your files to mp3s and then upload.

Pro tip: Patience, producer grasshopper! Wait until you’ve received the complete transcript notification in your inbox to edit. If you try to edit while the auto-transcript is still processing, it will overwrite your edits.

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3) EDIT

Our transcripts might need some editing love before you can make good use of them, but we’ve got you covered with our transcription key commands.

Pro tip: Use our transcript editing tools to swiftly clean up your transcripts. Then you can export the text and use it to shape your audio story. You can export transcripts with and without timestamps

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4) SEARCH

Get an overview of the day’s recordings, or zone in on a key moment by searching your audio.

Pro tip: You can search both within a single audio file, or within your entire collection. We’ll search your transcripts for keywords to get to the exact time-stamped point in the audio that you’re looking for:

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5) SHARE

If you’ve made it this far in the Radio Race, I bet you’ll want to show off your finished piece. We make it easy with an html embed code:

Pro tip: Share your masterpiece with the world! If your audio is public, grab one of our embed codes to post your audio to your own site, or click any of the “share” buttons on the Item page. You can use either a simple player, or an interactive transcript player, featuring tweetable transcript lines! 

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Good luck, and happy transcribing!