Writer Gore Vidal talked with Studs Terkel in 1968. Ostensibly a chat about his book, “Myra Breckenridge,” the freewheeling interview covers everything from the lack of play in modern schooling to the “almost sexual” thrill of watching Richard Nixon speak. An immensely quotable interview. 

https://www.popuparchive.com/embed_player/Gore%20Vidal%20talks%20with%20Studs%20Terkel%20on%20WFMT%20%3B%201968%2F04%2F03/27424/22304/938

Writer Gore Vidal talked with Studs Terkel in 1968. Ostensibly a chat about his book, “Myra Breckenridge,” the freewheeling interview covers everything from the lack of play in modern schooling to the “almost sexual” thrill of watching Richard Nixon speak. An immensely quotable interview. 

https://www.popuparchive.com/embed_player/Gore%20Vidal%20talks%20with%20Studs%20Terkel%20on%20WFMT%20%3B%201968%2F04%2F03/27424/22304/938

Pro Tip: Easy editing in Pop Up Archive’s built-in Transcript Editor

Based on your feedback about our in-transcript editing, we’ve given our editing interface a little makeover. Learn how to edit your automatic transcripts to perfection in our intuitive new editing interface. Speed up your way to a perfect transcript by pausing, rewinding, and jumping around lines in Pop Up Archive’s new edit mode.  

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Step 1: Click “Edit Transcript” to enter the editing workspace.

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Step 2: Click around your transcript to edit any line.

Now try clicking a line of your transcript: It looks just like a text editor. No need to be on the line that’s playing, simply click around your transcript to edit from any point in the text. 
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Step 3: Press play, click a line, and edit as you listen.

Use these simple key commands to pause, rewind, and navigate within your transcript.

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Step 4: We’ll save your changes along the way.

We auto-save all of your changes as you edit, and once you’re finished editing you can go back to the normal play mode by hitting “Save Transcript." 

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By starting with automatic transcripts and using Pop Up Archive editing tools, you’ll be looking at a complete transcript in record time. And when you’re done, you can search the exact words and phrases from your audio to the second.

Five innovative audio projects: New uses for recorded sound

Today’s wealth of public domain audio and open source tools has inspired many amazing projects in the media space. Here are just a few projects that show some interesting new ways to analyze or reuse audio.

1. Blank on Blank

This animation series by David Gerlach sets out to introduce new audiences to forgotten sounds. By pairing archival interviews with striking minimalist animations, the lost words of figures from Gene Wilder to Fidel Castro become newly relevant. 

2. The Speech Accent Archive

In this project from George Mason University, speakers from around the world are given the same paragraph to read. Each reading is then phonetically transcribed, catalogued, and uploaded to the site.  

3. The Sounds of Google Streetview

Amplifon, a hearing aid company, recently released a project to bring a new level of immersion onto the digital map. An open source project built on the Web Audio API, Sounds of Google Streetview lets you add and explore stereophonic ambient sound from Streetview scenes.

4. HiPSTAS

This NEH-backed project comes out of UT Austin’s School of Information. Originally developed to analyze bird calls, the ambitious project aims to identify and analyze patterns in speech such as pitch, rhythm, and timbre.

5. WikiVIP

Wikipedia’s “Voice Intro Project” is an experimental effort to add voice introductions by public figures onto their own Wikipedia pages. All recordings are released into the public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Know any projects we forgot? Let us know at founders@popuparchive.com!

Five innovative audio projects: New uses for recorded sound

Today’s wealth of public domain audio and open source tools has inspired many amazing projects in the media space. Here are just a few projects that show some interesting new ways to analyze or reuse audio.

1. Blank on Blank

This animation series by David Gerlach sets out to introduce new audiences to forgotten sounds. By pairing archival interviews with striking minimalist animations, the lost words of figures from Gene Wilder to Fidel Castro become newly relevant. 

2. The Speech Accent Archive

In this project from George Mason University, speakers from around the world are given the same paragraph to read. Each reading is then phonetically transcribed, catalogued, and uploaded to the site.  

3. The Sounds of Google Streetview

Amplifon, a hearing aid company, recently released a project to bring a new level of immersion onto the digital map. An open source project built on the Web Audio API, Sounds of Google Streetview lets you add and explore stereophonic ambient sound from Streetview scenes.

4. HiPSTAS

This NEH-backed project comes out of UT Austin’s School of Information. Originally developed to analyze bird calls, the ambitious project aims to identify and analyze patterns in speech such as pitch, rhythm, and timbre.

5. WikiVIP

Wikipedia’s “Voice Intro Project” is an experimental effort to add voice introductions by public figures onto their own Wikipedia pages. All recordings are released into the public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Know any projects we forgot? Let us know at founders@popuparchive.com!

Speech Recognition for Media: Rethinking Accuracy
Adapted from our post Speech Recognition for Media (PBS Idea Lab)

“How accurate are your automatic transcripts?" It’s one of the most frequently asked questions at Pop Up Archive — and one of the hardest to answer. It’s a fair question, yet it often anticipates an unfair answer: 100% accurate. Media producers want the ease and speed of automatic transcripts and captions, but are often loathe to publish anything short of this mystical percentage. 

The barrier to perfect accuracy: If this is what the people want, why don’t we give it to them? The fact is, machine transcription for media voices is a tricky business: you have to factor in background noise, overlapping speech, and poor audio quality. There’s no way to guarantee accuracy for automatic transcription for audio of ranging quality and content. 

We’d like to pose our own question: do you really need 100% accuracy? To value automatic transcripts only at 100% accuracy is to misunderstand the way the Internet reads text. After all, search engines don’t need perfect transcripts. Neither do producers looking for particular moments in hours of interviews. Harnessed the right way, speech-to-text software means effortless drag-and-drop access to crucial keywords and moments hidden deep within hours of content. 

Toward more searchable transcripts: That said, more accurate text still means more accurate search. Pop Up Archive is accomplishing this through speech-to-text that we target at specific genres of media — for example, news broadcasts, first-person interviews, and archival audio from different decades.

Intrigued? Get a free sample transcript for a short audio file from our new and improved speech-to-text software.

***Email us at founders@popuparchive.com to test the new software with your own audio.***

Speech Recognition for Media: Rethinking Accuracy
Adapted from our post Speech Recognition for Media (PBS Idea Lab)

“How accurate are your automatic transcripts?" It’s one of the most frequently asked questions at Pop Up Archive — and one of the hardest to answer. It’s a fair question, yet it often anticipates an unfair answer: 100% accurate. Media producers want the ease and speed of automatic transcripts and captions, but are often loathe to publish anything short of this mystical percentage. 

The barrier to perfect accuracy: If this is what the people want, why don’t we give it to them? The fact is, machine transcription for media voices is a tricky business: you have to factor in background noise, overlapping speech, and poor audio quality. There’s no way to guarantee accuracy for automatic transcription for audio of ranging quality and content. 

We’d like to pose our own question: do you really need 100% accuracy? To value automatic transcripts only at 100% accuracy is to misunderstand the way the Internet reads text. After all, search engines don’t need perfect transcripts. Neither do producers looking for particular moments in hours of interviews. Harnessed the right way, speech-to-text software means effortless drag-and-drop access to crucial keywords and moments hidden deep within hours of content. 

Toward more searchable transcripts: That said, more accurate text still means more accurate search. Pop Up Archive is accomplishing this through speech-to-text that we target at specific genres of media — for example, news broadcasts, first-person interviews, and archival audio from different decades.

Intrigued? Get a free sample transcript for a short audio file from our new and improved speech-to-text software.

***Email us at founders@popuparchive.com to test the new software with your own audio.***