What we learned about the speech of Oakland’s 2014 mayoral candidates

Analyzing political rhetoric using Pop Up Archive, Voyant, and Wordle

What we learned about the speech of Oakland’s 2014 mayoral candidates

Analyzing political rhetoric using Pop Up Archive, Voyant, and Wordle

Podcasts are having a moment, but can it last?

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CC BY-NC 2.0 by david shortle

It’s a thrilling time to be an audio-maker.
From Fast Company to the The Washington Post, press has caught wind of a “golden age of audio.” The buzz isn’t out of nowhere: more and more media organizations are putting their bets on podcasts, launching podcast networks like PRX’s Radiotopia and American Public Media’s Infinite Guest.

But there are still some barriers to overcome before born-digital audio storytelling is established as a viable medium. Less than half of Americans are even aware of podcasts — and the playback experience is apparently so intimidating that, in promotion of This American Life spinoff podcast “Serial,” Ira Glass was compelled to make a podcast download “explainer” video featuring his elderly neighbor.

We started Pop Up Archive to overcome obstacles to audio access.
We want it to be as easy to find an interesting radio show or podcast as it is to enter a search term on Google. And getting indexed by search engines shouldn’t require producers and distributors to rewrite stories from scratch, simply because they happen to be told originally as audio and not text.

Part of the answer lies in using speech-to-text software to extract keywords from media — so audio creators can focus on the story, not the transcript. We’re identifying the best ways to make use of machine transcripts and tags to help radio and podcast shows get discovered by audiences hungry for them. If you think you could benefit from this work, we’d love to hear from you!

There’s still time to join Pop Up Archive’s audio search pilot program for podcasts and radio shows. Apply here.

Pop Up’s Archival Audio Starter Kit

October is American Archives Month. In honor, we’ve put together a list of some of our favorite collections of archival audio, sorted by topic. Take this chance to explore the wealth of historical audio searchable in Pop Up Archive.

Twentieth Century Social Movements

War and the White House

Oral Histories

Music and the Arts

Space

Together, these collections present hundreds of hours of listening into the past. American Archive Month is the perfect excuse to dive into decades of painstakingly preserved audio.

Pop Up’s Archival Audio Starter Kit

October is American Archives Month. In honor, we’ve put together a list of some of our favorite collections of archival audio, sorted by topic. Take this chance to explore the wealth of historical audio searchable in Pop Up Archive.

Twentieth Century Social Movements

War and the White House

Oral Histories

Music and the Arts

Space

Together, these collections present hundreds of hours of listening into the past. American Archive Month is the perfect excuse to dive into decades of painstakingly preserved audio.

Creating audio that fits the web:  

Join Pop Up Archive’s audio search pilot program

“If you posted the most incredible story — literally, the most incredible story that has ever been told since people have had the ability to tell stories, it will never, ever get as many hits as a video of a cat with a moustache.”

– Radio and podcast producer Nate DiMeo as quoted in Stan Alcorn’s “Why Audio Never Goes Viral” (a must-read for audiophiles).

Cat jokes aside, it’s true: audio is at a serious disadvantage when it comes to discovery online. In the digital newsroom, there’s no such thing as off-air. Modern audiences listen on-demand. They’re no longer passive anymore, but rather content scavengers, seeking out and sharing media. So what makes audio so hard to find?

The problem:

Sound is opaque. You can’t picture audio, or skim the words in a recording. Its opacity makes it hard to share — there’s no visual content to latch on to. The text and images added to audio pages are labor intensive to create, and often fail to capture crucial content within audio.

The fact is, text is the medium of the web. But audio isn’t text. There’s no clear path for audiences to find even the most compelling audio.

The solution:

It’s possible now to deliver audio in ways that are accessible to digital audiences. So let’s prove that digital audio can be shared effectively. By generating automatic transcripts and keyword tags, the content of audio can already be effortlessly searched within Pop Up Archive. Over the next few months, we’re working with select media organizations to take this even further: making spoken-word audio more discoverable, shareable, and monetizable. 

The opportunity:

  • High-accuracy, speaker-differentiated machine transcripts for bulk quantities of audio – our automatic transcripts are timestamped, and searchable to the second
  • Content optimized for indexing by search engines, driving more traffic to media pages
  • Metrics about how Pop Up Archive’s tools affect audience engagement
  • Revived and expanded reach of evergreen content buried on servers or in website archives
  • Custom widgets that automatically embed tags, transcripts, and select snippets of audio into partner sites

Click here to learn more about the pilot, or send us an email at founders@popuparchive.com to start a conversation.

Creating audio that fits the web:  

Join Pop Up Archive’s audio search pilot program

“If you posted the most incredible story — literally, the most incredible story that has ever been told since people have had the ability to tell stories, it will never, ever get as many hits as a video of a cat with a moustache.”

– Radio and podcast producer Nate DiMeo as quoted in Stan Alcorn’s “Why Audio Never Goes Viral” (a must-read for audiophiles).

Cat jokes aside, it’s true: audio is at a serious disadvantage when it comes to discovery online. In the digital newsroom, there’s no such thing as off-air. Modern audiences listen on-demand. They’re no longer passive anymore, but rather content scavengers, seeking out and sharing media. So what makes audio so hard to find?

The problem:

Sound is opaque. You can’t picture audio, or skim the words in a recording. Its opacity makes it hard to share — there’s no visual content to latch on to. The text and images added to audio pages are labor intensive to create, and often fail to capture crucial content within audio.

The fact is, text is the medium of the web. But audio isn’t text. There’s no clear path for audiences to find even the most compelling audio.

The solution:

It’s possible now to deliver audio in ways that are accessible to digital audiences. So let’s prove that digital audio can be shared effectively. By generating automatic transcripts and keyword tags, the content of audio can already be effortlessly searched within Pop Up Archive. Over the next few months, we’re working with select media organizations to take this even further: making spoken-word audio more discoverable, shareable, and monetizable. 

The opportunity:

  • High-accuracy, speaker-differentiated machine transcripts for bulk quantities of audio – our automatic transcripts are timestamped, and searchable to the second
  • Content optimized for indexing by search engines, driving more traffic to media pages
  • Metrics about how Pop Up Archive’s tools affect audience engagement
  • Revived and expanded reach of evergreen content buried on servers or in website archives
  • Custom widgets that automatically embed tags, transcripts, and select snippets of audio into partner sites

Click here to learn more about the pilot, or send us an email at founders@popuparchive.com to start a conversation.