Case Study: How transcripts help branded podcasts

Telling great stories on a budget

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Punk rocker-turned-entrepreneur Brian Adoff has, of late, been trying his hand at podcasting. While considering marketing strategies for his software company, Swift Data Technology, Brian did what more and more companies are undertaking: he turned to on-demand audio to get the word out.

“From a business perspective, podcasts are an ideal format for content marketing because you can get right in someone’s ear. Instead of selling them something, you’re telling a story,” Brian says.

Owing to his DIY punk roots, Brian decided to produce the podcast himself. “I taught myself by listening to lots of podcasts about making podcasts,” he jokes. The end result was Campus Aux, a series of interviews with Swift Data users and industry experts.

Having discovered the PR benefits of his company’s podcast, which he shared with potential clients and partners, Brian founded Riveting FM, which pitches and produces series for other business-to-business companies. He sold his first client, door lock manufacturer Assa Abloy, on Unlocked, a six-episode podcast that gives first-person accounts of security-crisis situations like the recent UCLA shootings.

I used to start out by explaining to the sales team what exactly a podcast is. But now I think we’re hitting a tipping point as podcasting becomes an increasingly mainstream medium,” Brian says.

Panoply produces GE’s podcast The Message, which was #1 on the iTunes charts from November 21-25, 2015.

Unlocked is part of a rising trend of corporate podcasts, as Fortune recently reported (“Corporate America’s Love Affair With Podcasting”). GE, eBay, State Farm and the like are hiring powerhouse podcast networks like Gimlet and Panoply to oh-so-subtly use narrative content to promote their brands.

“I’m not Gimlet or Panoply. I’m not even a radio veteran,” says Brian, “but I taught myself how to produce a good story on a tight budget. That’s something business people can appreciate.”

Pop Up Archive helps Brian “run-and-gun” his one-person operation to stay on time and under cost. The timestamped transcripts, he explains, help him work as time-efficiently as possible and keep focused on producing new content.

Venturing ever deeper into the podcast realm, Brian is using the proceeds fromUnlocked and other contract jobs to produce Riveting FM’s first original series, “Drink Drank Drunk.” Sounding every bit as niche as his industry podcasts, though a good deal wackier, Brian describes the show as a heated discussion on grammar, featuring a heavy dose of alcohol and feminism.“Overall, I’m just trying to make shows that might not otherwise get made,” he says.

Learn more about Riveting FM