California here I come: Oral histories and tales of arrival in Pop Up Archive

A radio history of California immigration

Listen to firsthand accounts of arrival, detention and otherness. We gather audio from the collections of four great California radio stations — KALW, KCRW, KQED, and KPFA — to hear about the Chinese poems on Angel island detention center walls, the internment of the Japanese, the battle for San Francisco’s International Hotel and the drama of being undocumented.
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Searching 40,000 hours of broadcasting history

Pop Up Archive and WGBH embark on a landmark project to make the American Archive searchablelogos

On August 31, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) awarded $14.16 million in grant funding to libraries across the United States. We’re thrilled to announce that the WGBH Educational Foundation, together with the American Archive of Public Broadcasting and Pop Up Archive, received one of 276 National Leadership Grants.

The $898,474 grant includes transcribing, analyzing, and building crowdsourcing tools for almost 40,000 hours of digital audio from the American Archive of Public Broadcasting over the next two and half years. This will be the first major media archive of its kind: the new American Archive site will integrate full-text, searchable transcripts and crowdsourced metadata for thousands of hours of audiovisual materials.

Read more about the IMLS grantees announced last week.

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Bob Hope and Atomic Bill

A podcast about the time Bob Hope taught the US of A a little something about nuclear physics. It was 1950, just five years after the US dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The Soviet Union had just built their own bomb. And what did Americans, huddled around their radios, want to hear? Comedian Bob Hope, joking about the world “blowing itself up.” In this Popcast, Eliza Smith talks about “The Quick and the Dead,” a 1950 NBC special about atomic energy, hosted by Bob Hope and produced by Fred Friendly.

Original audio can be found on Pop Up Archive, courtesy of the Broadcast Archives at WILL and Illinois Public Media:

Bob Hope and Atomic Bill

A podcast about the time Bob Hope taught the US of A a little something about nuclear physics. It was 1950, just five years after the US dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The Soviet Union had just built their own bomb. And what did Americans, huddled around their radios, want to hear? Comedian Bob Hope, joking about the world “blowing itself up.” In this Popcast, Eliza Smith talks about “The Quick and the Dead,” a 1950 NBC special about atomic energy, hosted by Bob Hope and produced by Fred Friendly.

Original audio can be found on Pop Up Archive, courtesy of the Broadcast Archives at WILL and Illinois Public Media:

broadcastarchive-umd:

Why Care About Radio Broadcast History in the On-Demand Digital Age?

As the Radio Preservation Task Force embarks on a collective effort to identify and make publicly accessible radio broadcast recordings and the documents that inform their contexts of creation and use, it is worth posing the question of why we should care about these historical archives beyond their value as traces of the past. Indeed, a pervasive talk among cultural commentators and media scholars defines the significance and status of our contemporary media culture as a “post-broadcast” or “post-network” temporal break from a past media culture that emerged out of the radio broadcasting era of the first half of the 20th century… [more]

Incredible project.

broadcastarchive-umd:

Why Care About Radio Broadcast History in the On-Demand Digital Age?

As the Radio Preservation Task Force embarks on a collective effort to identify and make publicly accessible radio broadcast recordings and the documents that inform their contexts of creation and use, it is worth posing the question of why we should care about these historical archives beyond their value as traces of the past. Indeed, a pervasive talk among cultural commentators and media scholars defines the significance and status of our contemporary media culture as a “post-broadcast” or “post-network” temporal break from a past media culture that emerged out of the radio broadcasting era of the first half of the 20th century… [more]

Incredible project.