Bob Hope and Atomic Bill

A podcast about the time Bob Hope taught the US of A a little something about nuclear physics. It was 1950, just five years after the US dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The Soviet Union had just built their own bomb. And what did Americans, huddled around their radios, want to hear? Comedian Bob Hope, joking about the world “blowing itself up.” In this Popcast, Eliza Smith talks about “The Quick and the Dead,” a 1950 NBC special about atomic energy, hosted by Bob Hope and produced by Fred Friendly.

Original audio can be found on Pop Up Archive, courtesy of the Broadcast Archives at WILL and Illinois Public Media:

Bob Hope and Atomic Bill

A podcast about the time Bob Hope taught the US of A a little something about nuclear physics. It was 1950, just five years after the US dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The Soviet Union had just built their own bomb. And what did Americans, huddled around their radios, want to hear? Comedian Bob Hope, joking about the world “blowing itself up.” In this Popcast, Eliza Smith talks about “The Quick and the Dead,” a 1950 NBC special about atomic energy, hosted by Bob Hope and produced by Fred Friendly.

Original audio can be found on Pop Up Archive, courtesy of the Broadcast Archives at WILL and Illinois Public Media:

In 1972, speaking on Black Women’s Liberation, Wilhelmina Wanda Hogan reads from Sojourner Truth’s 1851 speech, “Ain’t I a Woman?”

“Well children, where there’s so much racket, there must be something out of kilter…That man over there says that women need to be helped into carriages, and lifted over ditches, and have to have the best place everywhere. Nobody ever helps me into carriages, or over mud-puddles, or gives me the best places. And aren’t I a woman?”

From Illinois Public Media, listen on Pop Up Archive

In 1972, speaking on Black Women’s Liberation, Wilhelmina Wanda Hogan reads from Sojourner Truth’s 1851 speech, “Ain’t I a Woman?”

“Well children, where there’s so much racket, there must be something out of kilter…That man over there says that women need to be helped into carriages, and lifted over ditches, and have to have the best place everywhere. Nobody ever helps me into carriages, or over mud-puddles, or gives me the best places. And aren’t I a woman?”

From Illinois Public Media, listen on Pop Up Archive

Gloria Steinem in 1972 on the two biggest threats to the Women’s Movement:

“It’s utopian to skip to humanism now. And the two things it seems to me that can most damage the movement – not stop it, I don’t think anything can stop it – but can most damage it are divide and conquer, you know, turning one outgroup against the other, and skipping to humanism too soon.”

–Illinois Public Media‬

https://www.popuparchive.com/tplayer/7828/Women%26apos%3Bs%20Liberation%2C%20Gloria%20Steinem%2C%20Margaret%20Sloan%2C%20et%20al%2C%20Part%20Two%2C%20May%2025%2C%201972

Gloria Steinem in 1972 on the two biggest threats to the Women’s Movement:

“It’s utopian to skip to humanism now. And the two things it seems to me that can most damage the movement – not stop it, I don’t think anything can stop it – but can most damage it are divide and conquer, you know, turning one outgroup against the other, and skipping to humanism too soon.”

–Illinois Public Media‬

https://www.popuparchive.com/tplayer/7828/Women%26apos%3Bs%20Liberation%2C%20Gloria%20Steinem%2C%20Margaret%20Sloan%2C%20et%20al%2C%20Part%20Two%2C%20May%2025%2C%201972

Creating accountability and access for news audio

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Politicians, by trade, speak often and at length. But the news cycle moves fast, and many words are quickly forgotten, or impossible to recover from hours of broadly labeled footage. That’s where we come in: rather than sift through hours of CSPAN video to research what’s been said about a policy, a search in Pop Up Archive takes you to the exact timestamped point of the relevant discussion.  

We’re processing audio for a number of news syndicates. Here are some news collections where you can search political keywords from the public archive:

  • The California Report (KQED): a daily news show for Northern California public media that follows the big issues and policy debates happening all around California.
  • Which Way, L.A.? (KCRW): Southern California’s "signature local public affairs program" covers not just local news, but also the most pressing national and international affairs.
  • News from Illinois Public Media: featuring top reporting out of NPR, Illinois Public Media, the Associated Press, and more.
  • Crosscurrents (KALW): In-depth local news served up daily through San Francisco Public Radio. 

While we’ve got you covered for radio news, what if you’re looking to search TV news? Thanks to a project from our friends at the Internet Archive, television news footage is more accessible than ever through the TV News Archive. They take media which has already been captioned and make that text searchable to the second.

The age of passive political listening is past. With these tools, you can zone in on your favorite issue with unprecedented acuity. 

Four Archival Picks for the Fourth of July

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Bust out your speakers, sprawl out on a picnic blanket and enjoy these Fourth of July picks from the archive: 

1. I’ll have the gospel bird with a side of rabbit fries, please. Finding America through its food. America Eats: A Hidden Archive – The Kitchen Sisters

During the 1930s, the WPA sent dozens of journalists, including Zora Neale Hurston and Eudora Welty, all throughout the country to document how America’s immigrant communities shaped local culinary traditions. Although the program, entitled “America Eats,” was shut down at the outbreak of World War Two, in this piece, The Kitchen Sisters continue the grand legacy of national food reporting.

2. Independence Day on the eve of America’s entry into WWII.  FDR’s Fourth Of July Address (1941) – WWII Broadcasts 

President Franklin Roosevelt gives a Fourth of July address in Hyde Park, New York just months prior to America’s entry into WWII. Evidently already ramping up for U.S. participation, Roosevelt proclaims that “the fundamentals of [freedom established in] 1776 are being struck down abroad.” This is also the recording in which Roosevelt famously said:

… the United States will never survive as a happy and fertile oasis of liberty surrounded by a cruel desert of dictatorship.

3. Everybody has their own American dream, but some of us have to work a lot harder than others to enjoy their piece of it Coming to America – Snap Judgment

Host Glynn Washington invites you to “put on your sunglasses and open up the fire hydrants for Snap Judgment’s Fourth of July special; amazing stories about people making America their home.” One highlight: a second generation Chinese American growing up in rural Virginia starts receiving threatening letters from the KKK, signed “the Wizard.” After her non-English-speaking mother suggests she write back, she adopts “The Wizard” as her whimsical penpal, hoping to swap stickers and playground stories. 

4. How the Declaration of Independence inspired Lincoln’s Gettysburg address. Our Secret Constitution: How Lincoln Redefined American Democracy – Illinois Public Media: Focus 580

In this interview with Focus 580, Columbia Law professor George P. Fletcher claims Lincoln was more inspired by the Declaration of Independence than the Constitution, which he felt only preserved the rights of the propertied white male elite. You know that “four score and seven years ago” line in the Gettysburg Address? It doesn’t date back to the historic document you would expect.

Happy Mother’s Day from Pop Up Archive! Here are five of our favorite listens from the Archive about all things maternal:

1. The Seven Daughters of Eve: The Science that Reveals Our Genetic Ancestry (Illinois Public Media) Iceman and his mama.

2. Home As Career-Killer: (The Broad Experience) An interview with Liz O’Donnell, author of Mogul, Mom & Maid on leaning in on the home front.

3. Dear Mama (Snap Judgement) Snap Judgement sits down at the “family table [and puts their noses] right in the middle of the most important relationship of all.”

4. Hidden Kitchen Mama (Kitchen Sisters) “Kitchens and mothers. The food they cooked or didn’t.”

5. Pregnant (Audio Smut) Three unusual tales about the path to motherhood, and how it can be everything from torture to ecstasy.

Happy Mother’s Day from Pop Up Archive! Here are five of our favorite listens from the Archive about all things maternal:

1. The Seven Daughters of Eve: The Science that Reveals Our Genetic Ancestry (Illinois Public Media) Iceman and his mama.

2. Home As Career-Killer: (The Broad Experience) An interview with Liz O’Donnell, author of Mogul, Mom & Maid on leaning in on the home front.

3. Dear Mama (Snap Judgement) Snap Judgement sits down at the “family table [and puts their noses] right in the middle of the most important relationship of all.”

4. Hidden Kitchen Mama (Kitchen Sisters) “Kitchens and mothers. The food they cooked or didn’t.”

5. Pregnant (Audio Smut) Three unusual tales about the path to motherhood, and how it can be everything from torture to ecstasy.