Searching 40,000 hours of broadcasting history

Pop Up Archive and WGBH embark on a landmark project to make the American Archive searchablelogos

On August 31, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) awarded $14.16 million in grant funding to libraries across the United States. We’re thrilled to announce that the WGBH Educational Foundation, together with the American Archive of Public Broadcasting and Pop Up Archive, received one of 276 National Leadership Grants.

The $898,474 grant includes transcribing, analyzing, and building crowdsourcing tools for almost 40,000 hours of digital audio from the American Archive of Public Broadcasting over the next two and half years. This will be the first major media archive of its kind: the new American Archive site will integrate full-text, searchable transcripts and crowdsourced metadata for thousands of hours of audiovisual materials.

Read more about the IMLS grantees announced last week.

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The best places to search for evergreen audio across the web

In nature, evergreens are trees that stay green all year round. In media, “evergreen content” is content stays fresh and interesting from news cycle to news cycle. It’s content that endures.

Read Pop Up Archive’s guide to finding audio that stays relevant through the ages, featuring incredible repositories of archival sound from the Internet Archive, Library of Congress, the British Library, and the collections at Pop Up Archive and Audiosear.ch.

The best places to search for evergreen audio across the web

In nature, evergreens are trees that stay green all year round. In media, “evergreen content” is content stays fresh and interesting from news cycle to news cycle. It’s content that endures.

Read Pop Up Archive’s guide to finding audio that stays relevant through the ages, featuring incredible repositories of archival sound from the Internet Archive, Library of Congress, the British Library, and the collections at Pop Up Archive and Audiosear.ch.

From the Archive: Poet Carl Sandburg on Abraham Lincoln

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Photo colorization by Sanna Dullaway / Original image from the Library of Congress

Essential listen today on the anniversary of Lincoln’s assassination: a speech by poet Carl Sandburg at the Freedom Centennial Conference in Bement, Illinois in 1955 (from Illinois Public Media.)

In the speech, he recites a poem from a “homely congressman from the Jayhawker state,” who, Sandburg says, “spoke that afternoon one the best poems ever spoken about Lincoln. The poets have done no better by Lincoln than this humble Kansas congressman, Homer Koch:”

There is no new thing to be said about Lincoln. There is no new thing to be said of the mountains or of the sea or of the stars. The years go their way, but the same old granite mountains lift their shoulders above the drifting clouds. The same mysterious sea beats upon the shore. The same silent stars keep holy vigil above a tired world. But to the mountains and sea and stars, men turn forever in unwearied homage. And thus with Lincoln. For he was a mountain in grandeur of soul; he was a sea in deep undervoice of mystic loneliness; he was a star in steadfast purity of purpose and service, and he abides.

The lecture is posted in four parts on Pop Up Archive. Listen to the first part below:

https://www.popuparchive.org/embed_player/%22Freedom%2C%22%20the%20Bement%2C%20IL%2C%20Centennial%20Conference%20of%201955%26%2346%3B%20Speech%20by%20Carl%20Sandburg%2C%20part%201%20of%204%26%2346%3B/7759/5322/583

Get the rest of your Lincoln fix by checking out the Abraham Lincoln tag on Pop Up Archive.

National Recording Preservation Plan | News Releases – Library of Congress

National Recording Preservation Plan | News Releases – Library of Congress