How to use Pop Up Archive’s plugin for Adobe Audition

 Working with raw tape often means toggling from window to window in order to align transcripts with audio editing software. With Pop Up Archive’s extension for Adobe Audition, you can simplify this process by bringing audio and transcript editing into one workspace.

We’ll walk you through the steps of setting up and using the extension in Adobe Audition.

 Download the Pop Up Archive add-on and open it in your editor

Once you’ve downloaded the Pop Up Archive add-on from the add-on store, you can open up the Pop Up Archive panel from the “Windows” drop-down menu under “Extensions.

You can snap the Pop Up Archive window into place by clicking the upper left corner and dragging the “Editor” panel in the dock.

Sync a Pop Up Archive audio item with a file in Audition

Open an audio file in Audition and transcribe by dragging and dropping it into the Pop Up Archive panel.

Once the file has finished transcribing, you can sync the transcript with your audio but selecting the Audition file and then pressing play in Pop Up Archive. Jump to any moment of interest by clicking the Pop Up Archive waveform or transcript — the waveforms sync up!

Note: Audition will sync with whatever file is open in Pop Up Archive, so make sure you have the same file open in both windows.

Search your transcript and mark key moments

Waveform syncing enables you to search for moments of interest in your Pop Up Archive transcript and mark that same moment in Premiere.

Find key moments of interest using the search toolbar. Type in a keyword and press the play button to the left of the line of text. Now toggle over to your Audition editing panel. Create markers by pressing hotkey M to indicate the beginning and end points of your clip. Copy to new and then rename this segment.

Upload more audio

Got more audio? Drag and drop audio into the extension window. Remember to select the new file in the Audition panel and press play in Pop Up Archive to sync the files. 

A collaborative, searchable oral history of New York City

The New York Public Library collects stories from around the city

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We spoke with Brian Foo, a developer for NYPL Labs, whose team is using Pop Up Archive to create an innovative, collaborative, fully searchable oral history project.

As part of its Community Oral History Project, the NYPL first started working with Pop Up Archive on Visible Lives, a collection of stories from New Yorkers living with disabilities. Over 60 community members have recorded 150 interviews and counting at NYPL branch libraries. The NYPL wanted to create an interactive listening experience for all audiences.

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The song banned by NASA

Astronauts don’t have days and nights like we do on earth, so they need some help regulating their sleep. Turns out, it takes a whole team of engineers down on earth to rouse NASA’s elite from their slumbers. In this Popcast, hear about the NASA tradition of “wake up songs” from Mission Control, including the one song that went too far.

Written and produced by Eliza Smith, narrated by Eliza Smith and Jacob Winik, with editorial help from Emily Saltz. Listen to more audio from the NASA Collection on Pop Up Archive, or read Terry Watson’s fan letter to “The Ledge.”

Bob Hope and Atomic Bill

A podcast about the time Bob Hope taught the US of A a little something about nuclear physics. It was 1950, just five years after the US dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The Soviet Union had just built their own bomb. And what did Americans, huddled around their radios, want to hear? Comedian Bob Hope, joking about the world “blowing itself up.” In this Popcast, Eliza Smith talks about “The Quick and the Dead,” a 1950 NBC special about atomic energy, hosted by Bob Hope and produced by Fred Friendly.

Original audio can be found on Pop Up Archive, courtesy of the Broadcast Archives at WILL and Illinois Public Media:

Bob Hope and Atomic Bill

A podcast about the time Bob Hope taught the US of A a little something about nuclear physics. It was 1950, just five years after the US dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The Soviet Union had just built their own bomb. And what did Americans, huddled around their radios, want to hear? Comedian Bob Hope, joking about the world “blowing itself up.” In this Popcast, Eliza Smith talks about “The Quick and the Dead,” a 1950 NBC special about atomic energy, hosted by Bob Hope and produced by Fred Friendly.

Original audio can be found on Pop Up Archive, courtesy of the Broadcast Archives at WILL and Illinois Public Media: