Free premium transcripts for everyone

Take premium transcripts for a spin — for free

We’ve had this change in the works for awhile, and we’re excited to share it with our community: as of this week, anyone who joins the 1 Hour Demo plan can try out the best of Pop Up Archive without paying a thing.

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Sign up here and Spread the word!

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A collaborative, searchable oral history of New York City

The New York Public Library collects stories from around the city

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We spoke with Brian Foo, a developer for NYPL Labs, whose team is using Pop Up Archive to create an innovative, collaborative, fully searchable oral history project.

As part of its Community Oral History Project, the NYPL first started working with Pop Up Archive on Visible Lives, a collection of stories from New Yorkers living with disabilities. Over 60 community members have recorded 150 interviews and counting at NYPL branch libraries. The NYPL wanted to create an interactive listening experience for all audiences.

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A transcription shortcut for the Radio Race

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On Saturday, August 8, our pals at KCRW’s Independent Producer Project are hosting their third annual Radio Race. During the race, producers (newbies and veterans alike) have just 24 hours to write, record, and edit a nonfiction radio story.

Heads up: there’s a special Pop Up Archive bonus! For the second year in a row, we’re partnering with Radio Race to offer you freebies. All participants can redeem a free hour of premium transcription for August, and the Radio Race winner gets a free yearlong subscription to Pop Up Archive’s one-hour plan.

Already signed up? Head over to Pop Up Archive to redeem your free hour of transcription by following this link.

Read on for our Pop Up Archive guide for Radio Race participants:

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New download options for transcripts

New download options for transcripts

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When it comes to transcripts, text is half the battle: formatting can be just as important. We want to give you transcripts that makes sense for your needs, so we’ve added new transcript export options designed to fit your workflows.

  • Need to see the timing at a glance to edit an interview or navigate an oral history? Select “Text Format with Timestamps.” Timestamps appear at speaker changes.
  • Need to publish or excerpt a transcript, and don’t care at all about timestamps? Choose “Text Format without Timestamps” and open the file with any text editor:
  • Need even more fine-grained timestamps? Choose the “SRT” caption format to get timestamps for every transcript line.
  • Need to make corrections to a transcript? Use Pop Up Archive’s editing tools, which include key commands to play, pause, and rewind audio.

Is there another download format you’d like to see? Let us know at edison@popuparchive.com!

Can’t type, won’t type

Thanks for the shout out, and for checking out our premium software release! Just send us an email, or fill in the contact form on our site (from the Enterprise plan) if you have questions about getting started. 

Also, to speak to your concerns about security issues: we do have a thorough privacy policy, which you can find in our terms of service. All of the audio that’s public on the site has either been publically uploaded by users, or is audio that we’ve found from the public domain. Users can also choose to make their audio and its machine-generated data private; all data is transferred using a secure protocol. Information security is very important to us. 

Hope that helps! 

rootofnothing:

Everyone hates logging. Which is why, half the time, we don’t do it.

So, what if I gave you access to someone who would type of all of your interviews, make them effortlessly searchable, and at any time of day? Thanks to machine transcription that’s about to happen. It’s just a question of when.

The BBC already has work underway in this area using the R&D product Comma, but there’s also an explosion in third parties offering this kind of service.

I’ve had my eye on Pop-up Archive for a while. Their interface looks slick and their prices are keen but they’ve also looked a bit iffy in the accuracy department with a few information security issues thrown in too (how happy are you with your sensitive rushes potentially being accessible to all?) But now they have upped their game with an enterprise offering which looks very tasty. I plan to give it a go, so watch this space for the verdict.

Check out the site here

https://www.popuparchive.com

Can’t type, won’t type

Podcasts are having a moment, but can it last?

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CC BY-NC 2.0 by david shortle

It’s a thrilling time to be an audio-maker.
From Fast Company to the The Washington Post, press has caught wind of a “golden age of audio.” The buzz isn’t out of nowhere: more and more media organizations are putting their bets on podcasts, launching podcast networks like PRX’s Radiotopia and American Public Media’s Infinite Guest.

But there are still some barriers to overcome before born-digital audio storytelling is established as a viable medium. Less than half of Americans are even aware of podcasts — and the playback experience is apparently so intimidating that, in promotion of This American Life spinoff podcast “Serial,” Ira Glass was compelled to make a podcast download “explainer” video featuring his elderly neighbor.

We started Pop Up Archive to overcome obstacles to audio access.
We want it to be as easy to find an interesting radio show or podcast as it is to enter a search term on Google. And getting indexed by search engines shouldn’t require producers and distributors to rewrite stories from scratch, simply because they happen to be told originally as audio and not text.

Part of the answer lies in using speech-to-text software to extract keywords from media — so audio creators can focus on the story, not the transcript. We’re identifying the best ways to make use of machine transcripts and tags to help radio and podcast shows get discovered by audiences hungry for them. If you think you could benefit from this work, we’d love to hear from you!

There’s still time to join Pop Up Archive’s audio search pilot program for podcasts and radio shows. Apply here.

Creating audio that fits the web:  

Join Pop Up Archive’s audio search pilot program

“If you posted the most incredible story — literally, the most incredible story that has ever been told since people have had the ability to tell stories, it will never, ever get as many hits as a video of a cat with a moustache.”

– Radio and podcast producer Nate DiMeo as quoted in Stan Alcorn’s “Why Audio Never Goes Viral” (a must-read for audiophiles).

Cat jokes aside, it’s true: audio is at a serious disadvantage when it comes to discovery online. In the digital newsroom, there’s no such thing as off-air. Modern audiences listen on-demand. They’re no longer passive anymore, but rather content scavengers, seeking out and sharing media. So what makes audio so hard to find?

The problem:

Sound is opaque. You can’t picture audio, or skim the words in a recording. Its opacity makes it hard to share — there’s no visual content to latch on to. The text and images added to audio pages are labor intensive to create, and often fail to capture crucial content within audio.

The fact is, text is the medium of the web. But audio isn’t text. There’s no clear path for audiences to find even the most compelling audio.

The solution:

It’s possible now to deliver audio in ways that are accessible to digital audiences. So let’s prove that digital audio can be shared effectively. By generating automatic transcripts and keyword tags, the content of audio can already be effortlessly searched within Pop Up Archive. Over the next few months, we’re working with select media organizations to take this even further: making spoken-word audio more discoverable, shareable, and monetizable. 

The opportunity:

  • High-accuracy, speaker-differentiated machine transcripts for bulk quantities of audio – our automatic transcripts are timestamped, and searchable to the second
  • Content optimized for indexing by search engines, driving more traffic to media pages
  • Metrics about how Pop Up Archive’s tools affect audience engagement
  • Revived and expanded reach of evergreen content buried on servers or in website archives
  • Custom widgets that automatically embed tags, transcripts, and select snippets of audio into partner sites

Click here to learn more about the pilot, or send us an email at founders@popuparchive.com to start a conversation.

Creating audio that fits the web:  

Join Pop Up Archive’s audio search pilot program

“If you posted the most incredible story — literally, the most incredible story that has ever been told since people have had the ability to tell stories, it will never, ever get as many hits as a video of a cat with a moustache.”

– Radio and podcast producer Nate DiMeo as quoted in Stan Alcorn’s “Why Audio Never Goes Viral” (a must-read for audiophiles).

Cat jokes aside, it’s true: audio is at a serious disadvantage when it comes to discovery online. In the digital newsroom, there’s no such thing as off-air. Modern audiences listen on-demand. They’re no longer passive anymore, but rather content scavengers, seeking out and sharing media. So what makes audio so hard to find?

The problem:

Sound is opaque. You can’t picture audio, or skim the words in a recording. Its opacity makes it hard to share — there’s no visual content to latch on to. The text and images added to audio pages are labor intensive to create, and often fail to capture crucial content within audio.

The fact is, text is the medium of the web. But audio isn’t text. There’s no clear path for audiences to find even the most compelling audio.

The solution:

It’s possible now to deliver audio in ways that are accessible to digital audiences. So let’s prove that digital audio can be shared effectively. By generating automatic transcripts and keyword tags, the content of audio can already be effortlessly searched within Pop Up Archive. Over the next few months, we’re working with select media organizations to take this even further: making spoken-word audio more discoverable, shareable, and monetizable. 

The opportunity:

  • High-accuracy, speaker-differentiated machine transcripts for bulk quantities of audio – our automatic transcripts are timestamped, and searchable to the second
  • Content optimized for indexing by search engines, driving more traffic to media pages
  • Metrics about how Pop Up Archive’s tools affect audience engagement
  • Revived and expanded reach of evergreen content buried on servers or in website archives
  • Custom widgets that automatically embed tags, transcripts, and select snippets of audio into partner sites

Click here to learn more about the pilot, or send us an email at founders@popuparchive.com to start a conversation.

Want custom speech-to-text software? We got you: Join our pilot program

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Pop Up Archive is working with engineers at the Berkeley International Computer Science Institute to build custom speech-to-text software for news organizations, historical audio collections, and religious institutions. We have an exciting slate of pilot partners already.Email us ASAP if you think your organization would be a good fit — spots are almost gone. 

We see the same problems again and again when it comes to speech-to-text services for these types of recorded sound:

● Turnaround times are slow and cost is high for human-generated transcription services. 

● Out-­of-­the-­box automatic speech­-to-text solutions are  not accurate enough. 

● Training speech­-to-text software is complicated work that few organizations are likely to undertake, given the significant time and resources required.  

That’s where we come in. By addressing needs common to news organizations and audio archives, Pop Up Archive is bringing cutting edge speech recognition methods to organizations that would otherwise never benefit from this technology.

We’re offering an exclusive pilot opportunity to U.S. media organizations and archives seeking customized speech­-to-text software for use in transcription and captioning.  

● The eight­ week pilot will create unique speech­-to-text vocabularies specifically tailored to these organizations, built directly from words and phrases commonly found in their content. 

● The resulting software will be entirely automated and will effectively gauge likeliness that sounds in a variety of contexts (including poor quality audio and background noise) correspond to words or phrases common to pilot organizations’ content. 

Our software was initially trained on a subset of audio and transcripts from PBS, the Broadcast Board of Governors, the Washington Post, and numerous independent producers, reporters, and radio stations.

Drop us a line if you’d like to join the pilot.

Advised by the British Broadcasting Corp. R&D team and partnered with the Public Radio Exchange, Pop Up Archive is supported by the Knight Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and 500 Startups.

New Tricks on Pop Up Archive: Easy Transcript Editing, Images, and Better Auto-Tags

Based on user feedback, we’ve added some new features to make managing your audio easier than ever.

On Pop Up Archive, you can now easily edit your transcripts on the fly with transcription key commands, add images to your collections, and get better auto-tags for your audio files:

image EASY TRANSCRIPT EDITING: Edit auto-transcripts with a single click:
Start by clicking the pencil button to the right of any line…

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…then use keyboard commands to play, pause, and jump between lines:

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image ADD IMAGES TO YOUR AUDIO: Select an image from your computer or paste a link to an image when you add or edit an audio item.
 
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image BETTER AUTO-TAGS: When we tag your audio automatically, we check the tags against Wikipedia to make sure they’re tag-worthy:

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As always, we’d love to hear your questions, suggestions, and ideas.
Coming soon: Heavy-duty improvements to the accuracy of auto-transcripts. We’ve got tricks up our sleeve, so stay tuned.