The best places to search for evergreen audio across the web

In nature, evergreens are trees that stay green all year round. In media, “evergreen content” is content stays fresh and interesting from news cycle to news cycle. It’s content that endures.

Read Pop Up Archive’s guide to finding audio that stays relevant through the ages, featuring incredible repositories of archival sound from the Internet Archive, Library of Congress, the British Library, and the collections at Pop Up Archive and Audiosear.ch.

The best places to search for evergreen audio across the web

In nature, evergreens are trees that stay green all year round. In media, “evergreen content” is content stays fresh and interesting from news cycle to news cycle. It’s content that endures.

Read Pop Up Archive’s guide to finding audio that stays relevant through the ages, featuring incredible repositories of archival sound from the Internet Archive, Library of Congress, the British Library, and the collections at Pop Up Archive and Audiosear.ch.

In 1972, speaking on Black Women’s Liberation, Wilhelmina Wanda Hogan reads from Sojourner Truth’s 1851 speech, “Ain’t I a Woman?”

“Well children, where there’s so much racket, there must be something out of kilter…That man over there says that women need to be helped into carriages, and lifted over ditches, and have to have the best place everywhere. Nobody ever helps me into carriages, or over mud-puddles, or gives me the best places. And aren’t I a woman?”

From Illinois Public Media, listen on Pop Up Archive

In 1972, speaking on Black Women’s Liberation, Wilhelmina Wanda Hogan reads from Sojourner Truth’s 1851 speech, “Ain’t I a Woman?”

“Well children, where there’s so much racket, there must be something out of kilter…That man over there says that women need to be helped into carriages, and lifted over ditches, and have to have the best place everywhere. Nobody ever helps me into carriages, or over mud-puddles, or gives me the best places. And aren’t I a woman?”

From Illinois Public Media, listen on Pop Up Archive

A look inside Pop Up Archive from AudioFiles

Rob Cooper: We’ve got almost 100 years worth of stuff on shelves. 
Caroline Lewis: That’s Rob Cooper from the B.B.C.. He says they’ve already digitized a lot of their T.V. shows, global newscasts and radio dramas, but that’s not enough. 
Cooper: They still sit on the digital equivalent of the dusty shelf because although they’re much more easily available, finding the interesting stuff in there, the good stuff, is the really challenging problem.

https://www.popuparchive.com/embed_player/Pop%20Up%20Archive/35169/29630/4026

Thanks to the AudioFiles’ podcast, produced by the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, for making this excellent story about Pop Up Archive. You can listen to the story about Pop Up on Pop Up, complete with a speaker differentiated transcript.

Pop Up Archive: Breakthrough in Speech to Text?

Illinois Public Media is a delight. It’s wonderful to work with people who care as much about audio preservation and access as we do!

willtech:

image

For the past year I’ve been working with a startup called the Pop Up Archive to improve the way WILL is archiving digital audio. It’s one thing to save a number of files in some form of managed digital storage – and in WILL’s case it’s a very large number of audio files. The challenge is…

Pop Up Archive: Breakthrough in Speech to Text?

broadcastarchive-umd:

Why Care About Radio Broadcast History in the On-Demand Digital Age?

As the Radio Preservation Task Force embarks on a collective effort to identify and make publicly accessible radio broadcast recordings and the documents that inform their contexts of creation and use, it is worth posing the question of why we should care about these historical archives beyond their value as traces of the past. Indeed, a pervasive talk among cultural commentators and media scholars defines the significance and status of our contemporary media culture as a “post-broadcast” or “post-network” temporal break from a past media culture that emerged out of the radio broadcasting era of the first half of the 20th century… [more]

Incredible project.

broadcastarchive-umd:

Why Care About Radio Broadcast History in the On-Demand Digital Age?

As the Radio Preservation Task Force embarks on a collective effort to identify and make publicly accessible radio broadcast recordings and the documents that inform their contexts of creation and use, it is worth posing the question of why we should care about these historical archives beyond their value as traces of the past. Indeed, a pervasive talk among cultural commentators and media scholars defines the significance and status of our contemporary media culture as a “post-broadcast” or “post-network” temporal break from a past media culture that emerged out of the radio broadcasting era of the first half of the 20th century… [more]

Incredible project.

Five innovative audio projects: New uses for recorded sound

Today’s wealth of public domain audio and open source tools has inspired many amazing projects in the media space. Here are just a few projects that show some interesting new ways to analyze or reuse audio.

1. Blank on Blank

This animation series by David Gerlach sets out to introduce new audiences to forgotten sounds. By pairing archival interviews with striking minimalist animations, the lost words of figures from Gene Wilder to Fidel Castro become newly relevant. 

2. The Speech Accent Archive

In this project from George Mason University, speakers from around the world are given the same paragraph to read. Each reading is then phonetically transcribed, catalogued, and uploaded to the site.  

3. The Sounds of Google Streetview

Amplifon, a hearing aid company, recently released a project to bring a new level of immersion onto the digital map. An open source project built on the Web Audio API, Sounds of Google Streetview lets you add and explore stereophonic ambient sound from Streetview scenes.

4. HiPSTAS

This NEH-backed project comes out of UT Austin’s School of Information. Originally developed to analyze bird calls, the ambitious project aims to identify and analyze patterns in speech such as pitch, rhythm, and timbre.

5. WikiVIP

Wikipedia’s “Voice Intro Project” is an experimental effort to add voice introductions by public figures onto their own Wikipedia pages. All recordings are released into the public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Know any projects we forgot? Let us know at founders@popuparchive.com!