Using Pop Up Archive to bring broadcast stories to digital communities

“Pop Up has been a way to make our process more efficient and allow ourselves to put more online, which is more sustainable for our staff and better for Vermont Public Radio as an organization.” —Angela Evancie, VPR Digital Editor for News

Angela Evancie is the digital editor for news at Vermont Public Radio. She facilitates online stories for VPR’s website, repurposing broadcast news for the web and overseeing special web-only projects such as data visualizations, interactive features, and videos (like this nifty explainer about the Iowa Caucus from 2016).

Most of any public radio station’s content is conceived of as an on-air (audio) product; the digital editor’s job is to make sure that the station is also serving online audiences, who are reading or interacting with the story in ways other than listening. Angela and her colleagues at VPR use a Pop Up Archive team account to transform on-air pieces into written content for the VPR website.

Source: Vermont Public Radio

VPR has three daily news magazines — Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Vermont Edition — and short interviews from each of these shows often find a second life as online articles.

A typical process starts with the radio broadcast being uploaded to Pop Up Archive. Sometimes, VPR editors take advantage of the fact that they’re publishing online as an opportunity to post a longer version of the original piece.  “After we get the transcript from Pop Up Archive, then it then gets edited. If we’re keeping the online piece in an interview format, we’ll just edit it for accuracy. Other times, we’ll rework the transcript into an article format,” Angela says. Next, the article is posted to VPR’s content management system, given art and final polish, and published to the web. A few recent examples that went through Angela’s team to be republished as content for online readers include a story on a children’s book about coping with death, an interview with author Chris Bohjalian, and an interview with Vermont’s new attorney general.

VPR also leveraged Pop Up Archive in the weeks leading up to the general election. The station conducted interviews with all of the major and third party candidates running for statewide office: 24 interviews in total. The interviews occurred over several weeks and aired in different shows and segments. In order for the web content to be valuable to readers and voters, VPR wanted to package the interviews in such a way that their audience could do side-by-side comparisons of the candidates on specific issues. They used Pop Up Archive to transcribe the interviews and repackaged the interview highlights into a comprehensive voters’ guide. “The content was among our most successful in 2016, and it wouldn’t have been possible without Pop Up,” Angela said.

The process of transforming broadcast content into web content is one that occurs at VPR almost daily. But when Angela started at VPR three years ago, its web operations team was much less robust, and the process of translating on-air content into web content happened much less frequently. Each time they wanted to share a written version of a piece online, Angela or another producer would have to do their own transcription by hand.

Pop Up Archive has been an important tool for the station as its appetite to do more online, while being realistic about resource and time constraints, has grown. “Pop Up has been a way to make our process more efficient and allow ourselves to put more online, which is more sustainable for our staff and better for Vermont Public Radio as an organization,” Angela says.

See you in the archive,
The Pop Up Archive team